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Junkers JU-52 Swiss ETA 2824-2 Automatic Watch w/ Sapphire Crystal #6256-1 — New in box

$689.00 $549.00

The unique dial on this model is a “corrugated sheet” design reminiscent of the material used in the Junkers JU-52 Tri-engine aircraft famous during 1930s-early 50s.  It is an automatic watch manufactured in Germany with adjusted 25 jewel, Swiss made ETA 2824-2 movement with luminescent hands, a date window, contrasting black numerals and scratch resistant sapphire crystal. Packaged in original Junkers tin with dark brown leather strap.  This is new with hang tag and papers from Junkers and Eta.

SKU: Junkers-ju-52-6256-1 Category: Tags: ,

Description

The unique dial on the Junkers JU-52 Swiss ETA 2824-2 Automatic Watch is a “corrugated sheet” design reminiscent of the material used in the Junkers JU-52 Tri-engine aircraft famous during 1930s-early 50s.  It is an automatic watch manufactured in Germany with adjusted 25 jewel, Swiss made ETA 2824-2 movement with luminescent hands, a date window, contrasting black numerals and scratch-resistant sapphire crystal. Features the silver Junkers logo at 6:00 position. Packaged in original Junkers tin with dark brown leather strap.  This is new with hang tag and papers from Junkers and Eta.

Features
Movement: Swiss ETA 2824-2 Automatic (self-winding)
Case: Stainless steel, 40mm x 11mm thick.
Back: Exhibition screw-in back
Crystal: Scratch-resistant sapphire
Band: Leather, contrast stitching, buckle closure. 20mm
Water Resistant: 50 meters
Warranty: 2 Years from Manufacturer

Additional interesting facts about the aircraft:

Ju 52’s participated in the attack on the Netherlands on 10 May 1940, where they were deployed in the first large-scale air attack with paratroops in history during the Battle for The Hague. No fewer than 295 Ju 52s were lost in that venture and in other places in the country, due to varying circumstances, among which were accurate and effective Dutch anti-aircraft defenses and German mistakes in using soggy airfields not able to support the heavy craft. On 10 May alone, 278 were downed or disabled.

Thus, almost an entire year’s production was lost in one day in the Netherlands. The lack of sufficient numbers of aircraft most probably heavily influenced the decision not to invade England following the Battle of Britain.